Druridge Bay – parkrun location 52

My 52nd parkrun location for this morning was an icy Druridge Bay, the most northerly parkrun in England while we were spending a weekend in Northumberland. While I was waiting in the cold and then running, Lucy took the dogs for a walk along the beach and found a couple of geocaches.

The route is two (well, about 1.9) very attractive laps of the lake, with some gentle undulations, some in the woods and some more open. And in the frozen north it was my first parkrun in a hat.

There were a few icy patches, but it was possible to find a route around them all without much difficulty.

I’d intended to take it relatively easy, but once I got warmed up I found someone to chase (thank you Jilly Bell), and she pulled me round increasingly quickly so the second lap was 40 secs per km faster than the first (and didn’t need a hat). Good start to the day.

Plans afoot

Since getting my place in The Big One next April, I’ve deliberately run a lot more races than previously, with more in the pipeline. Those planned still to do:

A pre-Christmas half-marathon on the Lee Valley Velopark on 23 December. I did a 10-mile run there in April, and I rather enjoyed it, so after Snetterton I’m still hoping to knock a second or two off the PB, but in any case it’s a good cold-weather focus.

Hadleigh Legacy 10k in January 2018. I did this in January 2017 and it was my hardest run by some margin. It’s run on the Olympic mountain-bike course, and is all hill, with some mud, rocks to run up and four tunnels for added fun. Definitely not one for a PB but for the fun and the challenge and the variety.

In March, my first overseas race, the Cyprus Half Marathon in Paphos. Not the most thrilling of routes, truth be told, but a great start and finish, and having spent so much time in Cyprus it will be fun to run a race there as part of the London Marathon build-up, 7 weeks out.

Other possibilities: the Stowmarket half-marathon in March is very local and a definite possibility, 5 weeks from London. The Tarpley 10 or 20 in February is also very local. However, none of these quite fit the distances my training plan is calling for, so I’ll reserve judgement for now.

Snetterton Race Track half-marathon

A chilly morning (zero degrees when we set out from home) made for a slightly tricky decision on what to wear for this race, and as I stood around before the start, wearing an extra fleece and still cold, I began to doubt whether I was going to be wearing enough. The large number of women in vests and skimpy shorts (there were a few men similarly attired but we’re typically less hardy) suggested that either they were going to be even colder, or maybe I would be ok, though the several billion goosebumps in evidence didn’t set my mind at rest.

The warm-up, though delayed because of late arrivals struggling to get to the course, eventually did its job, and once the race was underway I was fine. Later, I even contemplated throwing my gloves at Lucy who’d come to cheer me on. My top layer got increasing unzipped as the race went on.

The course was three laps of Snetterton motor racing circuit plus an out-and-back along an access road, which meant six crossings of a bridge with a noticeable little climb. Even without the bridge six times, it wasn’t quite as flat as I’d been lead to expect: not hilly but enough gradient to notice. It was a beautifully sunny day, albeit with a fair breeze which increased and was noticeable everywhere on such an exposed route. A fair few supporters, and the looped route meant that I got a personal cheer eight times, which is always great.


My objective was to beat, just, my PB from last month of 1:56:26. I was weakening slightly on the third lap, but reckoned I had just enough in hand to make it; however, my Garmin recorded me doing 21.2 km so the pace calculation was fractionally out, and at the water station on the third lap I had to wait several seconds for them to pour a drink as there was none ready, which I didn’t begrudge at the time but with hindsight was a bit frustrating since the end result was that my official time was 1:56:26. Couldn’t have done it if I’d tried.

So, another medal to add to the collection, plus a bottle of water after the finish. No goody bag – they’re often a waste so probably no bad thing. The site had shower blocks which I took advantage of, and then after a quick snack we walked slowly along the access road, being passed by the tailenders, back to the car and so to the White Stag in Hingham for a late lunch.

Brundall – parkrun location 51

After doing my home parkrun last weekend, this morning’s exploration took me to Brundall, just east of Norwich for my 84th parkrun at my 51st different course. It’s a fairly new “countryside park”, and on the small side as these things go, so despite a route looping back on itself, it was still four laps of the park. All on grass, with some modest undulations. It was a dry morning: I had deliberately chosen to head NE from home to get further from the rain to the SW.

As at March parkrun a few weeks ago, I fell prey to the temptation of the 24-minute pacer, today Nicole, on a day when I wasn’t quite up to it. It was a very busy start but I managed to keep close to her, but after half a lap she pulled slightly away and I never quite managed to catch her, but kept her not far away and worked hard to keep close. I thought perhaps she was going a fraction faster than needed, but it turned out that she knew from experience that the course is slightly long and had adjusted her pace accordingly, so although I did manage to get 5km done in under 24 minutes, the parkrun finish line took 24:10 to reach.

I thanked Nicole for pulling me round and making me run a bit harder than I would otherwise have done, and cheered a few people across the line.