Two in Essex – Hadleigh and Burnham-on-Crouch (67)

Hadleigh with Alex, Andy, Catherine, Claire and Lucy

That heading is the first time I’ve written anything quite like that – with the exception of the WLR gang at the Reading Half in 2010, I don’t think I’ve had more than two people known to me at a run. When I’d met with Catherine and Alex at Harlow, we’d agreed we should do it again soon with Lucy along too; it was also a little while since Southend parkrun in June when Lucy and Claire had run together; and with Andy having done some volunteering recently, it was to be his first run.

From near the start, the view across Benfleet Creek to Canvey Island with the estuarine Thames beyond
Lucy, Catherine and Alex getting ready at the start
Catherine, Alex, Lucy and me (sporting my new MK Marathon top)
Andy, Claire, me and Lucy
Me with one of the zeroes from the three-balloon 100, this being Hadleigh’s centenary run
Lucy and Alex on a beautiful morning

This was my fourth Hadleigh parkrun, and my slowest yet – I’m probably the heaviest I’ve been at Hadleigh, and not at maximum fitness either, but it was an enjoyable run, and I pushed myself hard enough to run all of it (having walked a little one at least one of the earlier, quicker, attempts).

After getting my breath back and my token scanned, I had a couple of bits of celebratory cake (it being Hadleigh’s 100th run), then I jogged back to find Lucy, Catherine and Alex. On the steep zigzagging section downhill, it was a bit of a challenge trying to run while keeping out of the way of those making their way slowly uphill. I passed Andy who was doing well, despite his slightly unconventional running kit.

I had to go about a kilometre to find the others, weary after the first steep uphill. We jogged a little downhill then tackled the long bouldery zigzags. Alex seemed keen to run on, so with Catherine’s encouragement she and I went on a bit; I’m not sure whether she then changed her mind or ran out of energy or just wasn’t yet comfortable with me, but we didn’t get all that far ahead and mostly walked uphill.

Soon we reached the finish with a sprint from Alex, and soon after a final push from Lucy with support from Catherine. Claire, as tail walker, came along a bit later. All was packed up and we walked back to the café. Although I had a recollection of cake here, there wasn’t much along those lines (surprisingly) but we were tempted by bacon or sausage baps, accompanied by some unusual chips/wedges/potato things, and sat outside chatting for a good while.

A great morning: lovely course, lovely weather, lovely company.

Burnham-on-Crouch (67)

Another parkrunday, another lovely morning, and the third consecutive visit to Essex. Once safely along the twisty B1010 (I count 10 right-angle bends, on flat land, in just 2.3km) I parked up and after a quick visit to the river-wall for the view, made my way to the start via the convenient toilets. I said hello to a few people, then offered some navigational guidance to Claire, which was good enough for her soon to be joining me on a chilly morning with temperatures just nudging 4° with a stiffish breeze which got stronger during the morning.

From the river-wall, a look up the River Crouch past Essex Yacht Marina on Wallsea Island

Soon the call “3, 2, 1, go” came, and I realised that I had forgotten to get my Garmin ready. I can have it ready 15 minutes early when I’m on my own, but give me company and I regularly forget. Fortunately it found a GPS signal within seconds, and as I was towards the back of the pack, I was able to start it as I crossed the line.

Looking east along the River Crouch from the parkrun route

I wished Claire a good run and took advantage of the firm grassy field to overtake much of the field before we climbed the zigzags onto the river wall and headed west into the headwind. The route took us to the marina on the north bank where we turned north alongside the marina, then a long loop around a grassy gentle slope and then retrace our route along the river wall, with the wind on our backs, descending a different path and back to the start. Then it all again for the second lap.

I overtook a couple of people on the ascent up the river wall, and then it was a long, long reeling in of Frances Nestor who was in front of me, it (unknowingly) being her turn to fulfil my objective once again of someone to help me keep my pace up. I caught her around the mid-point of the grassy loop, and managed, just, to keep ahead of her. I half thought she might catch me as we neared the finish, but my legs had a reasonable kick in them today and I accelerated nicely to the finish line.

After catching my breath, I thanked Frances and then ran back to find Claire and ran back in with her. We then went to Happy Returns, mentioned as the gathering place on the parkrun website but devoid of any parkrunners except Claire and me. We enjoyed hot chocolates, chatting about running and plans for sailing next year among other things, then went our separate ways, she back home and me to the recycling centre to deposit our old fridge-freezer.

South Woodham Ferrers (66)

Looking east down the River Crouch from near the start.

So having completed Cambridgeshire again last week, today it was time to return to Essex, and to South Woodham Ferrers parkrun on the River Crouch. I parked the car as instructed in the car park of Marsh Farm Animal Adventure Park, but there were surprisingly few other people about, and as I jogged down the path to the river, when I got to the south end, I turned back and looked along the path: no-one was behind me. However, I continued on, and found that almost everyone had parked in the car park for Marsh Farm Country Park, which is rather more convenient.

And they’re off…

After the briefings, we moved across the car park to the start, and were soon underway. The course runs around the car park onto the sea wall, which it follows for a little while before descending onto the marshes and going inland for a little while, eventually reaching another river wall at Clementsgreen Creek which we followed for a while before reversing our route on a track below the river wall, then taking a different route back to the River Crouch, eventually rejoining the outward route which we followed back to the finish funnel. I didn’t manage to find anyone to latch onto for an extended period today, four people fulfilling the role, each for a little while: the first three I eventually overtook; the fourth sprinted away from me every time I caught her up, and in the end finished eight seconds in front of me.

River Crouch looking upriver

A really lovely course. Final time 25:39, finishing 26th of 103.

Incidentally, I came across the 5000m dash-board today, which shows the numbers of people who have run all the parkruns in a particular area, and how others (including me) are progressing. It reports that there are only two people who’ve run all the East of England parkruns, and there are only another two people who’ve done more than 60 of the 70 runs in the region – clearly completion, or being very close to completion, is not a widespread thing. The site says I’m 18th equal on the list, and with 22 more to go I will take a while to rise up the rankings.

Commiserations

So, no place for me in next year’s London Marathon in the ballot – like 2018, but unlike 2018 I don’t plan to seek a charity place. I am proud of the funds I helped raise this year, and very grateful to family, friends and colleagues in their support, but I don’t want to put either myself or them in the position of asking for more money again so soon.

But I do still feel like I have unfinished business – I didn’t entirely succeed in what I aimed to do from a running point of view, particularly once my knee gave out at about mile 14 and so the second half turned into run-walk and my pace was much slower than planned.

So I’ve booked myself in for the MK Marathon on Monday 6 May after a good deal of deliberation as to where I wanted to run. It’s slightly more undulating than I would have liked, but I think the style of the course will suit me, and it’s not impractical to go and practice run on some sections over the winter. I did consider the Boston marathon (the one in Lincolnshire) as being the flattest in the country, but the course isn’t inspiring and it could be really challenging if a bit windy.

And in advance of that, Lucy and I will be spending a long weekend in Vienna at the start of April, when I’ll be running the Vienna City half marathon, fuelled by schnitzel and a slice of Sachertorte.

parkrun catch-up (numbers 98 to 104)

It’s been a little while since I posted here, during which time I’ve had a few more great Saturday morning parkrun experiences, so here’s a brief recap:

Harlow parkrun – location 60 for parkrun #98

me, Alex and Catherine

Harlow parkrun (my 60th different parkrun location) was an opportunity to meet with my friend Catherine and her daughter Alex. It’s described as an “undulating” course, and that sums it up: not actually a huge amount of ascent (just 53 metres) but it makes its presence felt more than one might expect. There’s a mixture of woodland and some very brown grass. The uphill start was very congested, but after a while I was able to stretch out a bit. Once I’d finished, I went back to find Catherine and and Alex and ran the last lap with them. We chatted for a while then Catherine took Alex off to get her ears pierced.

Felixstowe parkrun – parkrun #99

The plan to meet up with a friend in Clacton was abandoned as she wasn’t well, so Lucy and I went to Felixstowe for my second visit, where parkrun is along the prom: pancake flat apart from the gentlest of rises over the entrance to the pier. I set off too fast (5km PB pace) and couldn’t keep it up, but still finished in a good time. It’s a course with out-and-back in one direction, then out-and-back in the other. So by the time I’d finished, Lucy had gone past the finish into the second leg; I got my breath back then went to catch up with her, but it took far longer than I’d expected, and I only caught up at the second turn-around point. We ran in together, she knocking 45 seconds off her PB, which was fab.

We then went for a paddle (in my case) and swim (in Lucy’s case) in the sea to cool off, followed by a lovely ice-cream. A brilliant start to the day. I still can’t quite believe I’m going running with Lucy – it seems so unlikely.

Letchworth parkrun – location 61 for parkrun #100

My 100th parkrun was at Letchworth yesterday, my 61st parkrun location, en route to lunch in Surrey. This is the local parkrun for a couple of friends who were there to help mark the occasion, though Kate didn’t feel great as one of her contact lenses was malfunctioning and making her feel sick. Lucy was on finish tokens: I got a “99½” as I finished the first of two laps, and a nice cheer across the finish line. A surprisingly tough course: about three-quarters of it is on tracks and around field edges, with the relatively modest undulations (macro and micro) making their presence felt more than the numbers might have suggested, and lots of dodging around holes underfoot. Fortunately, despite a month’s rain in 36 hours, the previously dry ground meant that Calamity Corner didn’t live up to its name, being merely sticky, but I can see how it would be interesting in the winter.

Lucy with the prized token number 1 – neither of us are ever likely to be handed it at the end of a run

Ford parkrun – location 62 for parkrun #101

Ford parkrun is named after Ford Park in Ulverston. We’d popped up to the Lake District for the August Bank Holiday weekend. At one point I’d considered visiting Whinlatter, another Cumbria parkrun I haven’t yet been to, but Ulverston was closer and fitted in better with plans for today, so our weekend started off with me running the parkrun while Lucy watched and cheered with the dogs. The course description on the website is one which risks sowing confusion rather than light, and makes me grateful I’m in the middle of the pack and so usually need only to follow the person in front (but see Fritton Lake).

The start and the green field of the park are overlooked by the Hoad Monument, but once underway the focus is on the many twists and turns which make for an interesting run. Still recovering from the pain in my bottom (self-diagnosed as a strained piriformis muscle), I tried to take it easy, but found myself as so often finding someone to latch onto and pull me round a little faster than I felt comfortable with – we both accelerated in the final circuit of the field, but she pulled away for a sprint finish while I’d already given what I could. On only its third run, the organisation was excellent though the marshals were rather quiet.

Littleport parkrun – location 63 for parkrun #102


Lucy and I visited Littleport parkrun at the start of September, thus allowing me to complete Cambridgeshire again (for the third time). It was a decent sized crowd gathered outside the leisure centre on a beautiful summer morning for two-and-a-bit laps of two grassy field, linked by a relatively narrow trod and a broad tarmac path for a bit of variety. I’m still suffering from the effects of relatively little running (and too much gained weight) but was reasonably satisfied with my run. I joined Lucy as she went past with half a lap and the extra bit to go: she was finding it a bit tough with the conditions underfoot being more demanding than her previous two parkruns at Southend and Felixstowe, but still recorded a decent time.

Manor Field, Whittlesey parkrun – location 64 for parkrun #103

A visit to the inaugural parkrun at Manor Field, Whittlesey made me a little anxious as I know inaugural-chasers can risk overwhelming new parkruns, but fortunately the numbers weren’t excessive. It isn’t something I plan on making a habit, but it was interesting to experience the first time once. Today’s visit also enabled me to complete the Cambridgeshire parkruns (for the fourth time). As was to be expected, there were various announcements of thanks to those involved in getting the parkrun off the ground, and not quite the practised fluency that one can get where they have more experience, but all seemed well organised.

The parkrun is another around playing fields, and to be honest these never sound terribly appealing when reading about them online, but they can still be very pleasant and quite varied in reality – if they are “around” playing fields, then what is on the edge? In this case, the biggest edge feature was King’s Dyke and Ashline Lock which we ran past twice, plus some tree-lined sections and the distinctive smell from the leisure centre swimming pool. Once again I found someone to latch onto and she pulled me round, all the more helpful today as my GPS watch had a fit part-way round and claimed I was elsewhere in Whittlesey and then back again, and thus all the distances and paces were up the spout.

Afterwards, as I was cheering on some of the slower runners and chatting with one of the marshals, I heard and caught sight of steam and smoke from Union of South Africa pulling a train along the track on the other side of the river – I was too slow to grab a picture, but it was still great to see, especially as such a surprise.

Coldham’s Common parkrun – location 65 for parkrun #104

Andrew is one of the 13 Bushy pioneers who ran the first Bushy Park Time Trial, the format which evolved into the parkrun we know today.

Today we were on our way to Chester, and at one point had considered a stop in Kettering for parkrun, but the weather forecast suggested it would be raining hard there, and a sunny summer’s day when we can also have a ride on the train would be a better time to visit Kettering. So we picked Coldham’s Common – the second parkrun in Cambridge, thus allowing me to complete all the Cambridgeshire parkruns (for the fifth time!). Although originally Lucy had been going to run too, in the end we decided to save that for another time and get back on the road northwestwards as soon as we could.

The route is two circuits of two sets of playing fields, linked by a gate which needs to be used in both directions, and is thus potentially something of a bottleneck, but which was very well marshalled and didn’t cause me any problems. I latched onto another runner partway round the first lap, and she pulled me along at a decent pace. We both accelerated in the final few hundred metres but she pulled away with a better sprint finish than I have. After barcode scanning, I looked to thank her but she’d disappeared so we hit the road for Chester.

With the closure of Heartwood Forest parkrun, that takes my East of England tourism tally to 47 out of 70, two-thirds of the way. Although the journey can be more fun than the destination, I’m enjoying the target (even though it keeps moving) and the journey – it will take me a while yet to finish, so lots more interesting places to visit, and some to re-visit.